LPE Originals

AB5: Regulating the Gig Economy is Good for Workers and Democracy

Poverty is not a suspect classification under our Constitution, but it is an affront to life and dignity and to democracy more broadly.  With the evisceration of the U.S. welfare state and the judiciary’s deference to political outcomes in the area of “economics and social welfare,” employment is the primary legal and political means to address economic inequality. In turn,…

LPE Originals

Gig Worker Organizing for Solidarity Unions

The “gig economy” is one place where organizing outside of traditional trade unions is undoubtedly happening in surprising and perhaps unexpected ways. For example, on May 8, 2019, a group of independent app-based drivers in Los Angeles called the LA Rideshare Drivers United organized and launched an unprecedented international picket and work stoppage against Uber…

LPE Originals

Solidarity Unionism v. Company Unionism in the Gig Economy

The CEOs of the two top-competing gig firms—Uber and Lyft—penned a June 12, 2019 OpEd in the San Francisco Chronicle in which they claim that after over six years of local, state, federal, and international law-breaking, ignoring the concerns of drivers, and viciously fighting any efforts to achieve living wage and benefits, they are ready…

LPE Originals

Rule-Making as Structural Violence: From a Taxi to Uber Economy in San Francisco

Between 2012 and 2014, California regulators made critical decisions that ultimately restructured political economies of mobility around the world. In municipal and then state regulatory bodies, policy-makers refused to enforce existing taxi laws and regulations against so-called “ridesharing” services, including industry leader UberX, as well as Lyft, and Sidecar. Regulators determined that the companies were…