LPE Blog

Weekly Roundup: December 4, 2020
LPE Originals

Weekly Roundup: December 4, 2020

At the Blog We finished up our series on the law and political economy of animal agriculture with Lee Miller’s essay on the connections between climate justice and justice for animals. Since we didn’t have a roundup last week you may have missed Caroline Parker’s introduction to the series, Viveca Morris’s case for breaking up…. . .

Privatized “Affordable Housing” Is A Scam

Privatized “Affordable Housing” Is A Scam

You hear it everywhere: we need more “affordable housing.” It’s a seemingly uncontroversial call, and yet… a group of members of the LA Tenants Union were compelled to document the many and profound problems with the dominant model of privatized “affordable housing” in the United States.

At the Cost of an Animal

At the Cost of an Animal

Animal agriculture relies on cultural myths about farming. The animal rights movement seeks to build countervailing narratives that center the ugly reality. The result is an ongoing legal battle about speech, truth, and visibility.

Break Up the Modern Meat Trust

Break Up the Modern Meat Trust

Big Meat’s rise to power is not the result of entrepreneurial savvy exercised in a free market. Multinational meat conglomerates have flourished because they are massively subsidized at the public’s expense.

fat capitalist cartoon
LPE Originals

Weekly Roundup: November 20, 2020

At the Blog Madison Gray (3L at Penn Law and part of the LPE student network!) published two posts on organized houseless folks winning a big victory in Philadelphia by refusing to budge from encampments they set up to support each other. Her first post recounts the struggle, drawing from the words of organizers themselves.…

Not an “Achievement Gap”, a Racial Capitalist Chasm

Not an “Achievement Gap”, a Racial Capitalist Chasm

Throughout this pandemic, transnational corporations and white parents alike have been sounding the “achievement gap” alarm under the guise of concern for “voiceless” Black and Brown children, but in service of their own neoliberal agendas. The students they speak of, however, can speak for themselves — and as they struggle through this time, with. . .

What Makes An Administrative Agency “Democratic”?

What Makes An Administrative Agency “Democratic”?

Scholarship thus far has not reconciled the relationship between democratized agency policymaking and the regular lawmaking done by Congress. To ameliorate the inexorable agency costs, theorists generally pose two different solutions: (1) a democratization of agency discretion, e.g., by making notice and comment procedures more robust; or (2) forcing Congress. . .

Tax Havens: Legal Recoding of Colonial Plunder

Tax Havens: Legal Recoding of Colonial Plunder

The end of European empires during the mid-twentieth century and the independence of former colonies was many things: an oft-violent conflict between unequal opponents, a clash of ideas and ideologies, a struggle over rights and self-determination. Less frequently considered is that decolonization involved a dramatic movement of money and a legal reorganization of. . .

On Socialism and Critical Legal Theory

On Socialism and Critical Legal Theory

A recent workshop on the “Jurisprudence of Distribution” invited the opening panelists each to provide a five-minute overview of what a contemporary approach within left legal theory might offer. Other speakers covered Critical Race Theory, Feminism, Vulnerability Theory, left political economy, and so on. I took socialism and critical legal theory.. . .