Reclaiming the Right to Future Tense

Reclaiming the Right to Future Tense

By now, many of the societal, political, and distributive harms caused by large technology companies and so-called “social” media companies (Amazon, Facebook, Google, etc.) have been surfaced.  They invade our privacy, decrease market competition, erode our sense of self and, despite their euphemistic label, our sense of community.  Shoshana Zuboff’s new book—The Age of Surveillance…

Racism is at the Heart of the Platform Economy

Racism is at the Heart of the Platform Economy

This post argues that race and racism are segmenting the new “on demand” labor markets, in ways that facilitate the transition to this new sector of the economy.  Scholars of racial capitalism have argued that modern capitalism could never have gotten off the ground without the violence of slave labor in the cotton economy. Violent…

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 3

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 3

In the prior two posts in this set I described how the leading mainstream economic explanation of rising inequality and its primary critique treat technology.  The former takes technology as central, but offers too deterministic or naturalistic a conception of both technology and markets such that it functions, in effect, to legitimize the present pattern…

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 2

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 2

Yesterday I outlined the ways in which the dominant “skills-biased technical change” and “winner-take-all economics” explanations of inequality share an idealized view of both markets and technology as natural and necessary.  Today I’ll write about the most influential criticism of these dominant stories that have been developed by labor economists.  These focus on the central…

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 1

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 1

Yochai Benkler  — What role does technology play in rising inequality?  Is it, as the dominant view among policymakers argues, the primary explanatory variable, operating in reasonably efficient markets to shape the value of different workers, and hence the pay they can command?  Is it, as labor economists critical of the mainstream imply, a side…

Accountability for the Internet of Torts

Accountability for the Internet of Torts

Tort law has always shaped political economy in the wake of technological developments. Sometimes it operates to protect the powerful; sometimes it intervenes in power relations to correct new imbalances. The history of tort law can be understood as a series of case studies in how new technologies enable new conduct and harms, and in…

Introducing the Internet of Torts

Introducing the Internet of Torts

Once upon a time, missing a payment on your leased car would be the first of a multi-step negotiation between you and a car dealership, bounded by contract law and consumer protection rules, mediated and ultimately enforced by the government. You might have to pay a late fee, or negotiate a loan deferment, but usually…

Worker Surveillance and Class Power

Worker Surveillance and Class Power

Companies around the world are dreaming up a new generation of technologies designed to monitor their workers—from Amazon’s new employee wristbands, to Uber’s recording whether its drivers are holding their phones rather than mounting them, to “Worksmart,” a new productivity tool that takes photos of workers every ten minutes via their webcams. Technologies like these…

Rule-Making as Structural Violence: From a Taxi to Uber Economy in San Francisco

Rule-Making as Structural Violence: From a Taxi to Uber Economy in San Francisco

Between 2012 and 2014, California regulators made critical decisions that ultimately restructured political economies of mobility around the world. In municipal and then state regulatory bodies, policy-makers refused to enforce existing taxi laws and regulations against so-called “ridesharing” services, including industry leader UberX, as well as Lyft, and Sidecar. Regulators determined that the companies were…

Data Nationalization in the Shadow of Social Credit Systems

Data Nationalization in the Shadow of Social Credit Systems

The political economy of digitization is a fraught topic. Scholars and policymakers have disputed the relative merits of centralization and decentralization. Do we want to encourage massive firms to become even bigger, so they can accelerate AI via increasingly comprehensive data collection, analysis, and use? Or do we want to trust-bust the digital economy, encouraging…

Artificial Sovereigns:  A Quasi-Constitutional Moment for Tech?

Artificial Sovereigns: A Quasi-Constitutional Moment for Tech?

Consider the following developments: In recent weeks, the explosive revelations about Cambridge Analytica and its systemic data-mining of Facebook profiles has cast into relief the way in which our contemporary digitized public sphere is not a neutral system of communication but rather a privately built and operated system of mass surveillance and content manipulation. Meanwhile,…

Technology, Political Economy, and the Role(s) of Law

Technology, Political Economy, and the Role(s) of Law

Julie E. Cohen – Legal scholars who work on information policy tend to focus on questions about how existing doctrinal and regulatory frameworks should apply to information-era business models and online behavior, perhaps undergoing some changes in coverage or emphasis along the way. They have asked, in other words, how law should respond to the…

Law and the Political Economy of Technology

Law and the Political Economy of Technology

In April, Jack Balkin, Yochai Benkler and I convened a workshop on the law and political economy of technology at Yale Law School. Participants drafted thought papers, which we spent the better part of two days discussing.  In the coming weeks, many participants will post revised papers or reflections in a series of posts that…