The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 3

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 3

In the prior two posts in this set I described how the leading mainstream economic explanation of rising inequality and its primary critique treat technology.  The former takes technology as central, but offers too deterministic or naturalistic a conception of both technology and markets such that it functions, in effect, to legitimize the present pattern…

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 2

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 2

Yesterday I outlined the ways in which the dominant “skills-biased technical change” and “winner-take-all economics” explanations of inequality share an idealized view of both markets and technology as natural and necessary.  Today I’ll write about the most influential criticism of these dominant stories that have been developed by labor economists.  These focus on the central…

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 1

The Role of Technology in Political Economy: Part 1

Yochai Benkler  — What role does technology play in rising inequality?  Is it, as the dominant view among policymakers argues, the primary explanatory variable, operating in reasonably efficient markets to shape the value of different workers, and hence the pay they can command?  Is it, as labor economists critical of the mainstream imply, a side…

Accountability for the Internet of Torts

Accountability for the Internet of Torts

Tort law has always shaped political economy in the wake of technological developments. Sometimes it operates to protect the powerful; sometimes it intervenes in power relations to correct new imbalances. The history of tort law can be understood as a series of case studies in how new technologies enable new conduct and harms, and in…

Introducing the Internet of Torts

Introducing the Internet of Torts

Once upon a time, missing a payment on your leased car would be the first of a multi-step negotiation between you and a car dealership, bounded by contract law and consumer protection rules, mediated and ultimately enforced by the government. You might have to pay a late fee, or negotiate a loan deferment, but usually…

Worker Surveillance and Class Power

Worker Surveillance and Class Power

Companies around the world are dreaming up a new generation of technologies designed to monitor their workers—from Amazon’s new employee wristbands, to Uber’s recording whether its drivers are holding their phones rather than mounting them, to “Worksmart,” a new productivity tool that takes photos of workers every ten minutes via their webcams. Technologies like these…

The Political Economy of Freedom of Speech in the Second Gilded Age.

The Political Economy of Freedom of Speech in the Second Gilded Age.

We are now well into America’s Second Gilded Age. The First Gilded Age was the era of industrial capitalism that begins in the 1870s and 1880s and continued through the first years of the 20th century, ultimately giving way to the reforms of the Progressive Era. The First Gilded Age produced huge fortunes, political corruption…

Rule-Making as Structural Violence: From a Taxi to Uber Economy in San Francisco

Rule-Making as Structural Violence: From a Taxi to Uber Economy in San Francisco

Between 2012 and 2014, California regulators made critical decisions that ultimately restructured political economies of mobility around the world. In municipal and then state regulatory bodies, policy-makers refused to enforce existing taxi laws and regulations against so-called “ridesharing” services, including industry leader UberX, as well as Lyft, and Sidecar. Regulators determined that the companies were…