LPE Blog

Where is the Political Economy?

Where is the Political Economy?

Embracing the terms “economy” and “political economy,” as LPE has done, risks – unless we are careful – invoking just the kind of separate, reified realm that we are trying to critique. In our view, defining “the economy,” and studying how legal institutions have done so, should be central issues that LPE scholarship aims to address.

An Algorithmic Bon Marché? Platform Governance in Urban Spaces

An Algorithmic Bon Marché? Platform Governance in Urban Spaces

The last few decades have been characterized by the return of market fundamentalism: the belief that society can and should be organized through the institutional mechanism of “self-regulating markets.” Many expected that the 2008 financial crisis might constitute a blow to pervasive market expansion and a check on global dominance of private corporations. Not. . .

On Law and Racial Capitalism in Palestine

On Law and Racial Capitalism in Palestine

The anti-discrimination framework imagines a situation where authorities unjustifiably favor some categories of its population over others. While this analysis is not wrong, it obscures how Zionism – the political movement for a state for all Jews in the world and Israel’s official ideology – privileges even foreign Jews, to varying extents, over. . .

Government Failures and Private Options

Government Failures and Private Options

Increasingly progressives are championing “public options” as a response to various market failures. Public options in the all-important health care space stand in for old-school regulation of private providers and old-school redistribution (to better support those struggling to pay for private insurance and medical services). Public options in banking,. . .

fat capitalist cartoon

Weekly Roundup: June 4, 2021

Democratic institutions as power-builders, market governance as inherently collective, and antimonopoly in farm policy. Plus, the Global Health Justice Partnership is looking for fellows.

Antimonopoly Is About Democratizing the Food System (and the Rest of the Economy)

Antimonopoly Is About Democratizing the Food System (and the Rest of the Economy)

The goal of antimonopoly policy is not simply to help farmers. Antimonopoly law seeks to redistribute decision making power systematically down the supply chain. Expanding workers’ rights and enacting antimonopoly laws must go together. Establishing more rights for labor without also restructuring this system is unlikely to do more than make marginal improvements. . .

Democracy against Proceduralism

Democracy against Proceduralism

If political morality is to inform our analysis of legal institutions, it must account for the way that these institutions construct coalitions and endow them unequally with power. Theories that focus on fairness or political equality do not sufficiently account for these dynamic and iterative aspects of institutions. What is needed is a democratic morality. . .