LPE Blog

LPE Blog

Spread the Fed, Part II

Spread the Fed, Part II

From Federal Disintegration through Community QE to Central Bank Decentralization In the post immediately preceding this one, I observed that the twinned histories of American ambivalence toward centralized political governance on the one hand and central banking on the other place recent development in the realms of both pandemic response and American public. . .

Spread the Fed, Part I

Spread the Fed, Part I

Central banking and finance in the US have a curiously ‘dialectical’ history – a history mirroring, in interesting ways, that of our federal union itself. Both histories reflect ambivalence about, and hence oscillation both toward and away from, collective agency and its political manifestation in centralized governance. Tracing these parallel trajectories. . .

Policing as Unequal Protection
LPE Originals

Policing as Unequal Protection

Black Americans have endured police violence since the nation’s founding. The origins of American policing have been traced to slave patrols. Today, Blacks are more likely than whites to encounter police, to be stopped by police, and to be fatally wounded by police. In recognition of this history and ongoing experience. . .

fat cat capitalist cartoon

Weekly Roundup: August 7, 2020

This week at the blog…

We continued our ongoing series responding to the BLM uprisings.

Aya Gruber took carceral feminism to task.

Cynthia Godsoe turned an abolitionist eye to the (so-called) child welfare system.

An Abolitionist Horizon for Child Welfare

An Abolitionist Horizon for Child Welfare

The COVID-19 pandemic and police killings of George Floyd and other Black men and women have starkly revealed society’s race and class-based inequality and brought unprecedented attention to the excesses of the carceral state. One arm of punitive state regulation, however, has gone largely undiscussed: the “child welfare” system, which I call here,. . .

Carceral Feminism at a Crossroad

Carceral Feminism at a Crossroad

In this watershed moment when policymakers feel liberated to embrace noncarceral responses to the behaviors that laws label crimes, one question rings out: “What about rape and domestic violence?” The pro-policing contingent intends this as a rhetorical “gotcha.” But many progressives open to meaningful reform genuinely worry about the demise of. . .

Weekly Roundup: July 31, 2020

Weekly Roundup: July 31, 2020

This week at the blog…

Noah Zatz analyzed the ways in which the CARES Act does and (mostly) does not support care work. He argues that the prioritization of supporting the formal employment market makes the support for care work maddeningly indirect and even perverse, especially as the pressure builds for returning kids to school.

The. . .

Rent Cancellation: Social Protection in Uncertain Times
LPE Originals

Rent Cancellation: Social Protection in Uncertain Times

With the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, interlocking structural inequities in health, employment, and racial justice have buffeted vulnerable populations. The looming “eviction apocalypse” sits at the nexus of these three ills. Black and Latinx people have the highest COVID infection, death, and unemployment rates nationwide. Mass. . .

Where Is the Care in the CARES Act?
LPE Originals

Where Is the Care in the CARES Act?

Two pandemic policy stories have been coming to a head: (1) the push for another relief bill as a key CARES Act unemployment insurance benefit expires on July 31, and (2) the ongoing national child-care crisis as school closures for the fall are announced amidst the virus’ resurgence. What connects them is. . .

fat cat capitalist cartoon

Weekly Roundup: July 24, 2020

This week at the blog… Ivana Isailović analyzed the political struggles over working from home through the lenses of social reproduction and workers’ control over their time, comparing policy responses in France and the U.S. and Katharine Jackson argued that LPE should borrow some analytical tools from political theory to separate out different. . .

Situating the Role of Democracy in LPE
LPE Originals

Situating the Role of Democracy in LPE

One of LPE’s foundational commitments, as Sanjukta Paul reminds us, is that law constitutes markets – and that, as a result, we are free to constitute them differently. But this simply begs the question: how ought we constitute them? This is where political theory can be useful. As Sam Bagg points out, many LPE scholars already understand that. . .

The “New Normal” Privatization of the Workplace
LPE Originals

The “New Normal” Privatization of the Workplace

As the COVID-19 crisis rages on, individuals around the world are now thrown into a work-from-home, digitally-enabled “new normal” of the workplace. For most white-collar workers, homes have become offices, and boundaries between work and domestic life are being reshuffled. This shift, however, is just an acceleration of prior developments well under. . .

fat capitalist cartoon

Weekly Roundup: July 17, 2020 (Featuring New Editors!)

This week at the Blog… we continued our symposium on the legal representation of poor people. On Monday, Gregory Louis argued that critical legal practice requires a critical realist approach to law: looking everywhere, not just courts, to interfere in the political contests that structure and restructure governance regimes. On Tuesday, Sam. . .