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LPE Blog

Weekly Roundup: May 3, 2024

Darryl Li on the political economy of artillery shells, and Student reflections from the encampments at Columbia, CUNY, NYU and Yale. Plus, a CfP on dollar hegemony, a collection of critical legal work on Gaza, two open letters from law faculty, and new pieces by Adam Tooze on the political economy of Columbia University, David Stein & Ira Regmi on. . .

Weekly Roundup: April 26

Maggie Blackhawk on The Constitutional Bind, Vincent Bevins on a decade of failed protests, and Sandeep Vaheesan and Jonathan Harris on the FTC’s final rule banning non-compete clauses. Plus, new pieces from around the web by Gabriel Winant, Laleh Khalili, Cynthia Estlund & Alan Bogg, Meena Jagannath & Nikki Thanos, Michael Fakhri. . .

Weekly Roundup: April 18

Aziz Rana and Willy Forbath kick off a symposium on the The Constitutional Bind, and Uʻilani Tanigawa Lum and Kaulu Luʻuwai discuss the disastrous effects of plantation capitalism in Maui. Plus, a cool job with the Health and Political Economy Project, a CFP for junior work law scholars, and several new LPE-relevant papers, interviews, and articles. . .

Weekly Roundup: April 12

We offer our biannual round-up of forthcoming LPE and LPE-adjacent scholarship, while Premal Dharia concludes our symposium on Radical Acts of Justice. Plus, the fourth session of our Courts series with Amy Kapczynski and Ganesh Sitaraman; a special issue of Law & Contemporary Problems with work by David Grewal, Christine Desan, and others; an. . .

A Crisis of Purpose in Public Defense

That public defense is in a state of crisis is far from controversial. Crushing caseloads and rampant underfunding have created untenable working conditions under which even the most well-meaning defenders often struggle to effectively represent their clients. And yet, Jocelyn Simonson, in her important new book Radical Acts of Justice, identifies a. . .

Weekly Roundup: April 5

Mila Versteeg, Kevin Cope, and Gaurav Mukherjee on the right to sleep under bridges, Luke Messac on how the IRS could reduce medical debt, and Elizabeth Dale on the history of popular police power. Plus, the fourth session of our Courts series with Amy Kapczynski and Ganesh Sitaraman, a TWAIL conference on non-western Imperialisms, an upcoming event on. . .

Popular Justice Reborn? 

The activists depicted in Radical Acts of Justice challenge the idea that criminal prosecutors represent “the People.” But where did that idea come from in the first place? By tracing the long shift in American history from informal, non-professional law enforcement to our current system of formal, bureaucratized law enforcement, we. . .

How Nonprofit Hospitals Deny Financial Assistance to Patients

Nonprofit hospitals frequently deploy administrative hurdles to prevent low-income patients from receiving legally-mandated financial assistance. As a result, patients who should have qualified for assistance instead have billions of dollars of debt placed on their credit reports or sold to aggressive collectors. The IRS could mitigate this cruel practice by. . .

Weekly Roundup: March 28

Chris Essert on homelessness and property; Ganesh Sitaraman, Sanjay Jolly, Zephyr Teachout, Nikolas Guggenberger, Anupam Chander, and Elettra Bietti on the pending TikTok ban; and Meredith Whittaker on regulating social media in a time of rising illiberalism. Plus, upcoming events on Law and American Empire and Law and Marxism, as well as new pieces by. . .

Social Media, Authoritarianism, and the World As It Is

Disagreement over recent TikTok legislation reveals a deep divide about our current political moment. Should we, like many of the bill’s proponents, assume the existence of a functional, liberal state whose machinery tends toward justice? Or do recent illiberal trends give us reason to reject this assumption? Before we move to further concentrate global. . .